Rudyard Kipling Elementary School

Moving Forward

Kipling Elementary School is a Chicago Public School educating students from Kindergarten through 8th grade.

2017-2018 Welcome Letter and School Supply List

Dear Parents and Guardians,

 

Welcome to 5th grade! I am Mrs. Rebecca Gonzalez and I will be your student’s math and science teacher during this exciting year. I look forward to getting to know you and your child and helping EVERY student reach their highest potential, which in turn will guide them in their future endeavors. This year will be a time full of new and challenging learning experiences for your child.

 

I am a graduate of Illinois State University with a Bachelors of Science in Education. This is my 6th year as a teacher at Kipling and I look forward to another positive year with a quality education. I believe as an educator that my job is to enhance the quality of your child’s life through education. Having said this I am very excited to be here at Kipling and look forward to working with your student and furthering them down their educational path.  My teaching will be based on three basic components: setting high academic expectations that include interactive learning experiences for each student, creating a routine of responsibility and respect to form a collaborative classroom, and the involvement of parents and guardians in their child’s education to show a positive relationship between home and school.

This year our classroom theme will be “The Road to Responsibility”. It is essential that your child takes on great responsibility and is open to learning not only to be successful this year but also to prepare them for 6th grade and the new common core standards. (For more information visit http://www.corestandards.org/) To become responsible our classroom will also focus on respect. Respect is something that will be taking very seriously in the 5th grade. Not only will our class learn to respect themselves but they will also learn to respect others.

Fifth grade can be a big transition for many students and my goal is to do my best to be supportive of your child throughout the year along with your assistance. A positive parent-teacher relationship will be key. I will be contacting you often to inform you of your student’s progress and for volunteer opportunities on field trips. I also want you to know that I am always willing to meet or speak with you in regards to your child’s progress and responsibilities as a fifth grader. I am available by email or the school phone to set up an appointment. My email is rmgilbert@cps.edu and the school phone number is (773) 535-3151.

Within in the first week of school I will be sending home a family survey so I can get to know your student and your family and my business card that will share my contact information so you will always have it handy.

 

School Supplies 2017-2018

5th  & 6th Grade Team

  • Headphones MANDATORY

  • 1 accordion folder

  • 2 folders

  • Student Friendly Agenda

  • 6 Composition Notebooks (no spiral notebooks)

  • Poster Board (keep at home until needed)

  • 2 Package of Pens

  • 1 Package of Red Pens

  • 4 Packages of sharpened pencils

    • Students should keep 3 packages at home until needed.

  • A pencil sharpener in a plastic sealable bag.

  • 4 packs of loose leaf wide-ruled paper

    • Students should keep 2 packs at home until needed. Students should keep paper in a folder or binder.

  • 2 glue sticks (no liquid glue)

  • Markers and colored pencils

  • 1 Calculator (not required)

  • 3 boxes of tissue

  • 3 bottles of hand sanitizer (no soap)

  • 3 rolls of paper towels

  • 2 reams of copy paper

  • Clorox or Lysol wipes

Bolded items are used for the entire class and will be collected by the teacher. Students will be expected to have 3 sharpened pencils and 3 pens on them at all times.

 

Helping Your Child with Test-Taking

-- Helping Your Child Succeed in School

You can be a great help to your child if you will observe these do's and don'ts about tests and testing:

  • Do talk to your child about testing. It's helpful for children to understand why schools give tests and to know the different kinds of tests they will take.

  • Explain that tests are yardsticks that teachers, schools, school districts and even states use to measure what and how they teach and how well students are learning what is taught. Most tests are designed and given by teachers to measure students' progress in a course. These tests are associated with the grades on report cards. The results tell the teacher and students whether they are keeping up with the class, need extra help or are ahead of other students.

  • The results of some tests tell schools that they need to strengthen courses or change teaching methods. Still other tests compare students by schools, school districts or cities. All tests determine how well a child is doing in the areas measured by the tests.

  • Tell your child that occasionally, he will take "standardized" tests. Explain that these tests use the same standards to measure student performance across the state or even across the country. Every student takes the same test according to the same rules. This makes it possible to measure each student's performance against that of others.

  • Do encourage your child. Praise her for the things that she does well. If your child feels good about herself, she will do her best on a test. Children who are afraid of failing are more likely to become anxious when taking tests and more likely to make mistakes.

  • Do meet with your child's teacher as often as possible to discuss his progress. Ask the teacher to suggest activities for you and your child to do at home to help prepare for tests and to improve your child's understanding of schoolwork.

  • Do make sure that your child attends school regularly. Remember, tests reflect children's overall achievement. The more effort and energy your child puts into learning, the more likely it is that he will do well on tests.

  • Do provide a quiet, comfortable place for studying at home and make sure that your child is well rested on school days and especially on the day of a test. Children who are tired are less able to pay attention in class or to handle the demands of a test.

  • Do provide books and magazines for your child to read at home. By reading new materials, a child will learn new words that might appear on a test. Ask your child's teacher for lists of books for outside reading or get suggestions from your local library.

  • Don't get upset because of a single test score. Many things can influence how your child does on a test. She might not have felt well on test day or she might have been too nervous to concentrate. She might have had an argument with a friend before the test or she might have been late to school because the school bus got caught in traffic. Remember, one test is simply one test.

  • Don't place so much emphasis on your child's test scores that you lose sight of her well being. Too much pressure can affect her test performance. In addition, she may come to think that you will only love her if she does well on tests.

  • Do help your child avoid test anxiety. It's good for your child to be concerned about taking a test. It's not good for him to develop "test anxiety." Test anxiety is worrying too much about doing well on a test. It can mean disaster for your child. Students with test anxiety can worry about success in school and about their future success. They can become very self-critical and lose confidence in their abilities. Instead of feeling challenged by the prospect of success, they become afraid of failure. If your child worries too much about taking tests, you can help to reduce the anxiety by encouraging the child to do the following things.

    • Plan ahead. Start studying for the test well in advance. Make sure that you understand what material the test will cover. Try to make connections about what will be on the test and what you already know. Review the material more than once.
    • Don't "cram" the night before. This will likely increase your anxiety, which will interfere with clear thinking. Get a good night's sleep.
    • When you get the test, read the directions carefully before you begin work. If you don't understand how to do something, ask the teacher to explain.
    • Look quickly at the entire text to see what types of questions are on it (multiple choice, matching, true/false, essay). See if different questions are worth different numbers of points. This will help you to determine how much time to spend on each part of the test.
    • If you don't know the answer to a question, skip it and go on. Don't waste time worrying about one question. Mark it and, if you have time at the end of the test, return to it and try again.

     

After the Test

Your child can learn a great deal from reviewing a graded exam paper. Reviewing will show him where he had difficulty and, perhaps, why. This is especially important for classes in which the material builds from one section to the next, as in math. Students who have not mastered the basics of math are not likely to be able to work with fractions, square roots, beginning algebra and so on.

Discuss the wrong answers with your child and find out why he chose the answers. Sometimes a child didn't understand or misread a question. Or, he may have known the correct answer but failed to make his answer clear.

You and your child should read and discuss all comments that the teacher writes on a returned test. If any comments aren't clear, tell your child to ask the teacher to explain them.

Resource: U.S. Department of Education

Thanksgiving Break Assigments

 1.  IXL 1 hour on any starred skills

2.  Thanksgiving Food Survey       

3. Complete Math Packet Pages 143-148

Thanksgiving Break Science/Math Assignment

1.    How many people are at your dinner? (This can be any dinner, not just a Thanksgiving meal) ____________

2.    List 5 items that are available to eat.

________________      __________________   _________________

________________    __________________

3.    Create 6 rows in a chart using these items. Each row should be labeled with one of the items that you can eat. You should have 3 columns. One should be titled Food, Tally and Frequency.

4.    You will need to survey the guest at dinner and tally how many people are eating each of the items you have chosen to use in your chart. Then you will write the frequency.

5.    Describe what conclusions you came to based off of your data. 

Mrs. Gonzalez's Homework Schedule

Students in the homerooms 114 and 119 will always have the following schedule for homework for math class unless I send a Remind text stating otherwise.

Monday: Students will complete a handout reviewing past or current skills.

Tuesday: Students will work on a weekly assigned IXL skill for 30 minutes. Check students agenda for the current week's skill. They are responsible for writing it down in class.*

Wednesday: Students will complete a handout reviewing past or current skills.

Thursday: Students will work on a weekly assigned IXL skill for 30 minutes. Check students agenda for the current week's skill. They are responsible for writing it down in class.*

Friday: Students will complete a handout reviewing past or current skills. 

* If a student is unable to use a computer with internet access on Tuesday and Thursday they are welcome to complete the whole hour of IXL anytime before Friday morning when they have access to a computer. 

Social Science Homework will occur sporadically. Typically the only homework for Social Science will be research projects, studying for a quiz or if an assignment is not completed in class. I will send a Remind message when projects are assigned.

Click the link below  to read about ways to help children at home with math homework.

Grade 5 Math Tips English

Grade 5 Math Tips Spanish

Please email me rmgilbert@cps.edu or message me on remind if you have any questions or concerns.

 

 

5th Grade- Math and Social Science Supplies List

School Supplies 2016-2017

Mrs. Gonzalez

5th Grade- Math and Social Science

 

  • Headphones/Earbuds

  • 3 two-pocket folders

    • Social Science/Math, Homework, Loose Leaf Paper

  • 4 Composition Notebooks

    • Math class will always use a composition notebook. Leave 2 at home for mid year.

  • 4 Packages of sharpened non-mechanical pencils

    • Students should keep 3 packages at home until needed.

  • A pencil sharpener in a plastic sealable bag.

  • 4 packs of loose leaf wide-ruled paper

    • Students should keep 2 packs at home until needed. Students should keep paper in a folder or binder.

  • 2 glue sticks (no liquid glue)

  • Markers and colored pencils

  • 1 Calculator (not required)

  • Highlighters

  • 3 boxes of tissue

  • 3 bottles of hand sanitizer (no soap)

  • 3 rolls of paper towels

  • 2 ream of copy paper

  • Clorox or Lysol wipes

 

Bolded Items are used for the entire class and will be collected by the teacher.